enthalpy!

the internal energy

10 Notes & Comments

Carel Fabritius’ the Goldfinch (1654) is one of my absolute favorite artworks, ever since I spotted him in an art book when I was twelve. I did not own many art books when I was a child. All my art books were hand-me-downs with cut-out shapes where past children were idle. For this one painting to grab my attention and my absolute love when my exposure was old masters, is a tremendous feat. I had even made a small reproduction of painting in watercolor pencils and it hangs in my childhood bedroom to this day.
I had learnt of the Frick Collection’s exhibition Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting from the Mauritshuis only in its last week. When I heard the Goldfinch was there, I stood outside in the below-freezing temperature for hours, when the exhibition’s popularity was at its peak just to see this one painting. Girl with the Pearl Earring? Cool, but I was there for Fabritius. To my surprise, the crowd was not around the Girl, but was instead around the Bird. I knew the Goldfinch was a very famous piece, but that it had a larger following than Vermeer’s painting was indeed a surprise. I think it might have surprised the Frick too, since there was a whole room dedicated to exhibition the Girl but the Bird was in a room with other old masters (in a corner too!). I had to thread my way through a miniature crowd to see it.
It turns out, Donna Tartt’s book The Goldfinch (2013) was released the same day as the exhibition’s opening. I had never read any of her books, but the news that maybe Tartt’s book was popularizing the exhibition (and thus the painting) drove me to get the book and read it to see what the fuss is about. It’s debatable if the book really increased the painting’s status - perhaps everyone loves the painting to the same degree as I do and I just never was aware of it.
I fell in love with the book too.
Illustrated above is a short doodle I made of Theo Decker, the book’s protagonist - or at least my image of him. I don’t know what an uptown haircut is precisely, and horn-rimmed glasses are so varied that I went for the style that was least like Harry Potter’s (I am aware of the irony). Theo’s journey kept me busy during subway rides and inactive hours. Even though in many ways, he’s a very unlikable character, my heart raced when he was in danger and soared with his when he was in love. It has been a while since I have read a book where the protagonist felt like a real human being and not just a character within a book. I wanted more.
I recommend the book if you’re up for a delicious long read.

Carel Fabritius’ the Goldfinch (1654) is one of my absolute favorite artworks, ever since I spotted him in an art book when I was twelve. I did not own many art books when I was a child. All my art books were hand-me-downs with cut-out shapes where past children were idle. For this one painting to grab my attention and my absolute love when my exposure was old masters, is a tremendous feat. I had even made a small reproduction of painting in watercolor pencils and it hangs in my childhood bedroom to this day.

I had learnt of the Frick Collection’s exhibition Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting from the Mauritshuis only in its last week. When I heard the Goldfinch was there, I stood outside in the below-freezing temperature for hours, when the exhibition’s popularity was at its peak just to see this one painting. Girl with the Pearl Earring? Cool, but I was there for Fabritius. To my surprise, the crowd was not around the Girl, but was instead around the Bird. I knew the Goldfinch was a very famous piece, but that it had a larger following than Vermeer’s painting was indeed a surprise. I think it might have surprised the Frick too, since there was a whole room dedicated to exhibition the Girl but the Bird was in a room with other old masters (in a corner too!). I had to thread my way through a miniature crowd to see it.

It turns out, Donna Tartt’s book The Goldfinch (2013) was released the same day as the exhibition’s opening. I had never read any of her books, but the news that maybe Tartt’s book was popularizing the exhibition (and thus the painting) drove me to get the book and read it to see what the fuss is about. It’s debatable if the book really increased the painting’s status - perhaps everyone loves the painting to the same degree as I do and I just never was aware of it.

I fell in love with the book too.

Illustrated above is a short doodle I made of Theo Decker, the book’s protagonist - or at least my image of him. I don’t know what an uptown haircut is precisely, and horn-rimmed glasses are so varied that I went for the style that was least like Harry Potter’s (I am aware of the irony). Theo’s journey kept me busy during subway rides and inactive hours. Even though in many ways, he’s a very unlikable character, my heart raced when he was in danger and soared with his when he was in love. It has been a while since I have read a book where the protagonist felt like a real human being and not just a character within a book. I wanted more.

I recommend the book if you’re up for a delicious long read.

artists on tumblr fan art theo decker donna tartt the goldfinch carel fabritius doodly doos Illustration

45493 Notes & Comments

animation-magic:

Frozen Extras: The Making of Frozen

This is so cute.

frozen josh gad jonathan groff kristen bell jennifer lee